Irons, not Iron

When you go upstairs in the Hunter House you will notice a collection of irons. These irons were donated by Lois Bulloch and are only part of her extensive collection. The irons range in age from the sad irons of the 1850's to an electric steam iron from the 1960's. They vary in size from the large tailor's "goose" to small sample irons used by traveling salesmen. Take a look at these irons and see how this common household tool has changed over the year. A common question about these irons is the term "Sad". This does not refer to the sentiments of the person sweating over a hot stove while pressing clothes. Sad is an old term for solid, so a sad iron is simply a solid piece of iron.

 These are some of the oldest irons in the collection, along with some trivets used to hold hot irons. The large iron with the twisted handle is a tailor's goose. 

These are some of the oldest irons in the collection, along with some trivets used to hold hot irons. The large iron with the twisted handle is a tailor's goose. 

 These irons show progress in iron technology. The wood handles allow the handle to remain cool. Removable inserts mean that some can be kept hot on the stove while one is used. The open base of the back iron was filled with hot coals so it would stay hot. 

These irons show progress in iron technology. The wood handles allow the handle to remain cool. Removable inserts mean that some can be kept hot on the stove while one is used. The open base of the back iron was filled with hot coals so it would stay hot. 

 These irons all stayed warm by burning fuel. The one in front attached to the household gas supply. The Coleman iron with its yellow fuel can was heated with gasoline.

These irons all stayed warm by burning fuel. The one in front attached to the household gas supply. The Coleman iron with its yellow fuel can was heated with gasoline.

 The coming of electricity led to the modern electric iron. No longer tied to a hot fire, electric irons allow clothing to be kept neat even while traveling.

The coming of electricity led to the modern electric iron. No longer tied to a hot fire, electric irons allow clothing to be kept neat even while traveling.